The prevalence and cost of Dry AMD


The Impact of AMD

People suffering from late stage Dry AMD inevitably face challenges in everyday activities like reading, driving, watching TV, and even recognising the faces of friends and family members.


The Physiology of AMD

The macula is a small area at the back of the retina, responsible for central vision. As the name suggests, AMD refers to the degeneration of the macula which results in the progressive loss of central vision.

In Dry AMD, the most prevalent form of the disease, yellowish deposits called drusen develop under the retina. This can kill the light sensitive cells of the macula, causing loss of central vision.

Late Stage Dry AMD results in loss of definition and colour in the central zone of one's vision, and hence is particularly debilitating. There is currently no cure, despite the widespread prevalence of this condition.

Late Stage Dry AMD results in loss of definition and colour in the central zone of one's vision, and hence is particularly debilitating. There is currently no cure, despite the widespread prevalence of this condition.